Que Pasa in Cabo?

December 28, 2015 Edition
BY: DAVID FLORES

Crane report.  Not the bird, the type of crane we see from the fourlane these days, building all those new developments between the highway and the ocean. Snell Real Estate threw a grandiose party to unveil the new Solaz tourist development that they are the exclusive agents for. This is part of the 131 room Solaz Luxury Collection Resort managed by Starwood, which already manages the multi awarded Esperanza Resort in Cabo San Lucas.

At the event, where guests were treated to French champagne and fabulous ors d’ouevres, sales were made on the spot. A Mexican family made a quick decision on a penthouse for $3.5 million and a first floor unit for $2.35 million for their children. Maybe the children already have children of their own, and the grandpas want to keep them five stories away.

The Solaz is owned by Quinta del Golfo de Cortez group, developers of the Sheraton Hacienda del Mar at Cabo del Sol. Most of the partners are tomato growers from Sinaloa, across the Sea of Cortez from us. Their success at Cabo del Sol has allowed their families to live and grow up in San Diego.

Solaz, which is not very far along in construction, will host the 2016-2020 World Tour Tournament of the Association of Tennis Professionals, which will give our tourist destination more exposure around the world.

Road fight. Not the road that’s on the move in the tourist corridor, we’re talking about the new road from Cabo to San Jose. The local Chamber of Commerce, (Canaco, for its looong name in Spanish), and the influential CCC, or Los Cabos Coordinating Council, have voiced their opposition to the toll on the spiffy new twolane road that runs from the road to Todos Santos, before entering Cabo, to near the San Jose international airport.

Both groups feel that 75 pesos, (about $4.33 at the current rate of exchange,) for using some 18 miles of a road is too much. And to add insult to injury, they point out that the road was built using our  own taxes. Not quite.

Canaco has already filed for a legal injunction, which could stop the SCT, (Mexico’s Ministry of Communications and Transport), from charging drivers until the matter is resolved in the courts. And, knowing our courts that could be years.

Actually, the SCT is not the agency charging for the use of the road, but CAPIFE, which stands for Federal highways and roads, a subsidiary of the SCT. The money goes to the contractor who actually built the road at their own expense, not that of the federal government.

Some drivers have complained that they lose cell phone signal along the road, that there is no presence of Green Angels emergency trucks, nor highway police. Hey! No cops is a blessing, as all the feds do is extort money from drivers. And you’re not supposed to be chatting on your cellie while you’re driving anyway. And why do you need the Green Angels? Are you saying you can’t go 18 miles without someone holding your hand? Geeze, what a bunch of whiners. It’s a nice road, and we like the charge, because it keeps the rif raf off the road and clears the way for us to barrel down the highway practically alone, and at whatever speed we want.

Culture for everyone! Alan Castro Ruiz, The city’s Director of Culture, took an entourage of artists to the state lockup in Santa Anita, north of San Jose, to perform for the inmates and bring a smile to their faces. Are they supposed to be smiling? Aren’t they supposed to be contemplating their transgressions? Even working on chain gangs?

Convention center to open mid-2016. Really? The state’s secretary of tourism, Genaro Ruiz, stated last week that the Los Cabos convention center should be up and running again six months from now.  Ruiz has been talking with several international and Mexican groups about possibly operating it, and he expects to hire a world-class firm. His words, not ours. So far, Ruiz has met with French, Canadian, American and Mexican firms. The facility has stood empty and has deteriorated badly due to hurricane Odile and subsequent neglect by our city government.

Hold on to those reins.  A female tourist fell of her rental horse on Medano beach last week and she was abandoned by the stable guides. She was just left lying there. The city inspectors were called, as well as paramedics, who took care of our precious tourist. The inspectors followed the horses’ tracks and shut down the business, as they did not even have a permit to operate.

Do we need another hotel? The Velas Group thinks so. They began operations in Puerto Vallarta in 1989 with the Velas Vallarta, and for their next trick they will begin construction of a nine story, 360 room resort in Los Cabos next year. The location of the 3.5 acre property has not been disclosed. The new resort will add to the 1,170 luxury rooms that the group has built in Mexico which in addition to Velas Vallarta includes Casa Velas – also in Puerto Vallarta –, Grand Velas Riviera Nayarit (Nuevo Vallarta) and Grand Velas Riviera Maya.

 Brothers Eduardo and Juan Velas got their start by signing an agreement to buy the land that is now the Velas Vallarta resort, with no money in hand. Or pocket. Or even bank. They took the signed deal to Fonatur, Mexico’s tourism development agency, and got the needed financing to build their first resort, proving once again that in Mexico it’s all about who you know. Of course they’re all time share. And that’s how fortunes are made.

Todos Santos inching along.  The quaint, seaside Magic Town located only 40 minutes north of Cabo finally has brand new streets, and is only waiting for the power company and Telmex to plant their underground wiring before pouring the new sidewalks. New street lighting, benches and facades are the next step for this artists’ nest that features some 20 art galleries and some of the best restaurants in Southern Baja, all with a very laid down atmosphere. Local citizens are still trying to raise funds for trees to be planted along the sidewalks, because trees are not in the government budget.

Robber finally caught.  A teenager who confessed to robbing at least 12 homes in Todos Santos, Pescadero and Elias Calles between May and December of this year, has been busted by state police. When his home was searched they found laptops, cameras, tablets, cell phones and much more loot. The pendejo was stealing the stuff faster than he could fence it.

The barrios affected were San Sebastián, Brisas del Pacífico, Las Tunas and Las Quintas, in Todos Santos; Las Palmas, in Pescadero, and in Elías Calles. Those who feel this kid might have been responsible for their robbery, should go to the Ministerio Publico (attorney general’s office) in La Paz to file a complaint and look over the list of items recovered. 

There have been way more than 12 robberies in the Todos Santos area, so either this guy is being modest describing his achievements, or there are more burglars out there.

Fishing tournaments. For 2016. The traditional Dorado Shoot Out fishing tournament will take place on July 16, Saturday, at the Palmas de Cortez resort in Los Barriles on the East Cape. The biggest, badest Dorado wins here. There’s over $165,000 in cash and prizes including a pick-up truck. $500.00 entry fee. Information: www.eastcapeshootout.com

And then on October 29,  the annual Tuna Shoot Out fishing tournament will take place, also at the Palmas de Cortez resort. You’re fishing for the biggest badest tuna here.  Approximately $35,000 prize based on 100 teams. You will need to pony up $500 for this one as well.  Information: www.eastcapeshootout.com

No olvidar! That’s Mex speak for Don’t forget! The Pelican Theatre of La Paz, now in its third, season, will present the Love, Loss and What I Wore play by sisters Nora and Delia Ephron this January 21, 22, 26, 27 and 28 at 7:00 pm. At the City Theater (Teatro de la Ciudad).

The play celebrates as well as redefines the expression, “wardrobe malfunction.” Tickets are only 150 pesos, or about $9 bucks, and are for sale at the Allende bookstore in La Paz and the Tecolote bookstore in Todos Santos. Most importantly, this nine Gringo bucks even includes wine at the end of the play. ,